Writing Prompt Generators

In a vain attempt to set myself up for success this year for National Blog Posting Month (30 posts in 30 days), I thought I would see what I could find for writing prompt generators using a search engine. I found a bunch for school-aged students of the “what would you change about your school, teacher, parent” variety. I also present this list as interesting, possibly helpful. I may try it a time or two this month in an effort to avoid blogging about blogging or blogging about participating in NaBloPoMo.

siggy

In which I forget a title

Threaden (a.) Made of thread; as, threaden sails; a threaden fillet.
Yarn (n.) Spun wool; woolen thread; also, thread of other material, as of cotton, flax, hemp, or silk; material spun and prepared for use in weaving, knitting, manufacturing sewing thread, or the like.

cozy_shawl_001

Here is the shawl I posted about last week. My husband likes to pick on me when he sees me knitting on it because I have ripped it out several times. He asks if I’ve ripped it out to which I show him my work rather than answer. The length speaks for itself. I have to say I believe this to be a simple lace pattern over an 8 row repeat, even though it’s knit in a heavier than lace-weight yarn. Once every two or so repeats, I end up having to rip out a few rows to figure out where I lost the stitch. (I never gain them, well, there was that one time . . . )

siggy

The Book Thief

by markus zusak
reading guide

a review/a summary
It’s not often I struggle to write about a book. What to say without giving too much away? A familiar topic fictionalized in an unique manner, “The Book Thief” will keep you turning the pages. The main character, Liesel, becomes a thief of books among other things. The narrator leads the reader through Nazi Germany in the late 1930s and early 1940s while following a child, her family, neighborhood and government. While technically a young adult book, I would highly recommend it for a wider audience including plain-old adults.

siggy

A new iPod

Late this summer my Nano developed a problem. I was no longer able to use the center click wheel. The iPod still played music/podcasts, I was just unable to select what I wanted to play in what order. It started at the beginning of the list, then I had to fast forward to the episode I desired. I attempted to fix this by only putting on a couple of episodes at a time, which was less than ideal, but worked as long as I had enough listening material. I toyed with purchasing a replacement wheel and inside electronics but was concerned about wasting money if I didn’t fix it. I was also a bit envious of the amount of space on newer iPods. When the Nano was in tip-top shape, I regularly filled it and had to leave off music lists or newer podcast episodes. On Friday, I will finishing paying for my “new” iPod Classic. I purchased it before Apple released its new line in September, but overall I’m happy with my purchase. I have a smaller Classic, 120GB, as opposed to the newer 160GB one that was released in September. I looked at other brands, other sizes, other others and decided that between the ease of use of iTunes and a similar price point for other mp3 players with comparable size, the Classic was what I wanted.

And it’s that time of year again, what’s on the iPod in the podcast realm. Many old favorites are still in the mix, some no loner on the list have discontinued new episodes, some have become a bit erratic, some just don’t suit me any longer and some I try again after a hiatus.

I’ve still decided not to review any of the new podcasts nor explain why others are no longer on the list. My skin isn’t thick enough when the podcasters leave me feedback. I feel guilty when I share my opinion which hurts complete strangers. Yes, they put themselves out there. Yes, I am trying to be unbiased, I have no stake in the success or failure of a podcast so I’m not playing favorites. Moving on . . .

Standard disclaimer-not all podcasts in my list are suitable for family listening, please check reviews left on iTunes and the shownotes for the podcasts to determine if you would enjoy or be offended by a podcast.

Still hanging on:

New-ish, but staying for a bit longer:

On probation:

If I add too many more to my lists, I’m going to have to take a screenshot and color code them as old, new, and on probation. If you have a podcast or know of one related to literature, crafting (knitting, crocheting, quilting, scrapbooking, stamping, etc), gardening, real-life stories, etc that is not commercially produced (we all know that Lion Brand Yarn has good things to say about itself, but I’m still not going to listen) leave a comment.

siggy

NaBloPoMo, year two

I posted a blog entry every day during the month of November 2008 and it worked for a little while, until I ran out of things to post about that were not related to being pregnant for most of 2009. I’m going to participate again this year, hoping to kick start the creative juices again. Stay tuned for thought provoking and or funny posts again.

siggy

Knitted Shawl

Threaden (a.) Made of thread; as, threaden sails; a threaden fillet.
Yarn (n.) Spun wool; woolen thread; also, thread of other material, as of cotton, flax, hemp, or silk; material spun and prepared for use in weaving, knitting, manufacturing sewing thread, or the like.

My knitting has been stalled for a while, for that matter much of my crafting has been stalled. When my fingers swelled up toward the end of my pregnancy, knitting and other crafts were neither easy nor enjoyable. I started work on a shawl in one color sometime in late August and decided that the color wouldn’t coordinate with everything I wanted to wear with it. I changed colors in early September and then had to purchase more yarn because I didn’t have enough. I found a colorway close enough to the skein I already had and started work again. Four days later Little Boo arrived, knitting was temporarily on hold, even though my knitting was around. After almost to two days of labor, our home-birth turned in a trip to the hospital for a major medical procedure to assist Little Boo’s arrival. Even with a flexible IV in my arm, where was no knitting. I was retaining too much fluid and not enough sleep.

So now I have a shawl that I need to complete but at least I’m making progress. This is the pattern. I haven’t taken photos of my knitting lately, maybe later this weekend, with a Little Boo holding the work-in-progress.

siggy

Book Club & The Help

by Kathryn Stockett
reading guide

a review
As the title indicates, this is a book I read for book club. I wouldn’t have read it otherwise. I find it hard to believe that a white author can write an account of life for African-American housekeepers/maids in the south in the 1960s. Penguin books had a podcast episode with the author about why she felt she could write this book. I listened to part of it and was so bored I turned it off before finishing it. The stories from the housekeepers/maids in the book were interesting enough to hold my interest.

a summary
A fictional account of the life of African-American housekeepers/maids set in the 1960s in Jackson, Mississippi. The book is written by a white woman and is told from the point of view of a white woman just out of college and two housekeepers/maids. The white woman, Skeeter, wants to be a journalist and decides to interview at least 12 woman who spent their lives taking care of other people’s children and house. The story is full of racial tension as all of the women sneak behind the backs of their employers, friends, family, neighbors and high-society. The story was creative enough to hold my interest, but I have no idea as to the accuracy of such an account, fictional though it is.

siggy